Monetary policy

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Monetary policy is a term that refers to the actions undertaken by a central bank, such as the Federal Reserve, to influence the availability and cost of money and credit to help promote national economic goals. The Federal Reserve Act of 1913 gave the Federal Reserve responsibility for setting monetary policy in the U.S.

The Federal Reserve controls the three tools of monetary policy: open market operations, the discount rate, and reserve requirements. The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System is responsible for the discount rate and reserve requirements, and the Federal Open Market Committee is responsible for open market operations. Using the three tools, the Federal Reserve influences the demand for, and supply of, balances that depository institutions hold at Federal Reserve Banks and in this way alters the federal funds rate. The federal funds rate is the interest rate at which depository institutions lend balances at the Federal Reserve to other depository institutions overnight[1]

The primary objective of the European Central Bank's monetary policy is to maintain price stability. The ECB aims at inflation rates of below, but close to, 2% over the medium term.[2]

References

  1. Federal Open Market Committee. Federal Reserve.
  2. The European Central Bank. Federal Reserve.